Low Birth Weight Increases Diabetes Risk in Black Women

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Low Birth Weight Increases Diabetes Risk in Black Women
Low Birth Weight Increases Diabetes Risk in Black Women

(HealthDay News) — Type 2 diabetes risk in black women is associated with low birth weight, independent of BMI, according to research published in Diabetes Care.

Edward A. Ruiz-Narváez, ScD, of the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, and colleagues analyzed data from 16 years of follow-up for a prospective cohort of 21,624 participants from the Black Women's Health Study. The researchers sought to assess the association between birth weight and incident type 2 diabetes.

Women with very low birth weight (<1,500 g), compared with those with normal birth weight (2,500 g to 3,999 g), were at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes (incidence rate ratio, 1.40), the researchers found. 

Women with low birth weight (1,500 to 2,499 g), compared with those with normal birth weight, also had an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes (incidence rate ratio, 1.13). 

This association remained almost the same after adjustment for BMI.

"Very low and low birth weight appear to be associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes in African-American women and the association does not seem to be mediated through body mass index," the researchers wrote.

Reference

  1. Ruiz-Narváez EA et al. Diabetes Care. 2014;37(9):2572-2578.
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