Diode Laser Promising for Reducing Submental Fat

The 1060-nm diode laser is a promising treatment for patients seeking an in-office, nonsurgical procedure for fat reduction without severe complications.

The use of a 1060-nm diode laser may be effective for treating patients with localized submental subcutaneous adiposities, according to findings from a study published in Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology.

The prospective, clinical pilot study evaluated the safety and efficacy of a 1060-nm diode laser for submental fat reduction at a center in Bangkok, Thailand. Participants were healthy women and men 20 to 65 years of age, weighing 60 to 80 kilograms with unwanted localized fat in the submental area.

Patients received 1 session of the 1060-nm diode Sculpsure laser device (Cynosure). An optimal power setting was selected to maximize treatment efficacy and provide safety and comfort for each patient.

The laser’s efficacy was assessed with use of clinical photographs and ultrasound images taken during the follow-up, and the participants answered an improvement scale survey. The primary endpoint was a statistically significant decrease in submental fat layer thickness vs baseline at 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment.

Our study demonstrated the potential role of 1060-nm diode laser for the treatment of localized submental subcutaneous adiposities.

A total of 20 participants completed the study. Their mean age was 34.55±6.19 years, 95% were women, and their mean body weight was 70.61±10.56 kilograms. The average energy setting of the laser session was 0.95 to 1.40 W/cm2.

The cohort had an average baseline submental fat thickness of 0.51±0.09 cm. A significant decrease in fat thickness was observed at month 3 after treatment vs baseline, with a decrease to 0.46±0.13 cm (P =.013). At 6 months, the submental thickness had increased to 0.48±0.12 cm. Compared with baseline, a nonsignificant change in the thickness occurred (P =.121).

The participants who did not gain body weight had a better response to treatment. The mean fat thickness in the nonweight-gain group (n=13) was 0.52±0.11 cm at baseline. The fat thickness in participants in the nonweight-gain group was significantly decreased at months 1 (0.46±0.12 cm; P =.014) and 3 (0.46±0.15; P =.042) vs baseline. The mean fat thickness of the weight-gain group (n=7) was not significantly reduced at months 1 or 3 (P =.106 and .197, respectively).

A majority of participants self-reported improvement at 1 and 6 months posttreatment, and mild erythema and mild tenderness were noted by all participants immediately after treatment. No severe side effects such as hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentation, scarring, fat dystrophy, or infection occurred.

Study limitations include use of a single treatment, the small sample size, lack of a comparative group, and the short follow-up.

“Our study demonstrated the potential role of 1060-nm diode laser for the treatment of localized submental subcutaneous adiposities,” concluded the researchers. “1060-nm Diode lasers is a promising alternative treatment modality for patients seeking an in-office, nonsurgical procedure for fat reduction without severe complications.”

This article originally appeared on Dermatology Advisor

References:

Wanitphakdeedecha R, Evangelista KER, Yan C, et al. The efficacy of noninvasive 1060-nm diode lasers for submental lipolysis: a pilot study. Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. Published online December 19, 2022. doi: 10.2147/CCID.S382582