(HealthDay News) — For patients with type 2 diabetes, interrupting prolonged sitting with 3-minute bouts of light-intensity walking or simple resistance activities every 30 minutes improves postprandial cardiometabolic risk markers compared with uninterrupted sitting, according to a study published in Diabetes Care.

Paddy C. Dempsey, MPhEd, from the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues conducted a randomized crossover trial involving 24 inactive overweight/obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Participants underwent 8-hour conditions of uninterrupted sitting (control), sitting plus 3-minute bouts of light-intensity walking every 30 minutes, and sitting plus 3-minute bouts of simple resistance activities every 30 minutes on 3 separate days (with 6 to 14 days of washout).

The researchers found that both activity-break conditions significantly reduced the incremental areas under the curve (iAUC) for glucose, insulin, and C-peptide compared with uninterrupted sitting. For triglycerides, the iAUC was significantly attenuated for simple resistance activities but not light-intensity walking.

“Interrupting prolonged sitting with brief bouts of light-intensity walking or simple resistance activities attenuates acute postprandial glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and triglyceride responses in adults with type 2 diabetes,” the researchers wrote. “With poor adherence to structured exercise, this approach is potentially beneficial and practical.”


Continue Reading

Reference

  1. Dempsey PC, Larsen RN, Sethi P, et al. Benefits for Type 2 Diabetes of Interrupting Prolonged Sitting With Brief Bouts of Light Walking or Simple Resistance Activities. Diabetes Care. 2016. doi:10.2337/dc15-2336.