(HealthDay News) — Trends show that diabetes incidence has stayed higher in recent decades than it was in the 1970s, although in the past decade, diabetes incidence remained steady despite the ongoing trend of rising adiposity, according to research published in Diabetes Care.

Tobin M. Abraham, MD, of Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues examined trends over the past 4 decades using data from 4,795 participants, aged 40 to 55 years, in the Framingham Heart Study.

The researchers found that the annualized rates of incident diabetes per 1,000 individuals were 2.6, 3.8, 4.7 and 3.0 for women, and 3.4, 4.5, 7.4 and 7.3 for men, in the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s, respectively. 


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Compared with the 1970s, the age-adjusted and sex-adjusted relative risks for diabetes were 1.37 (95% CI, 0.87-2.16; P=.17) in the 1980s, 1.99 (95% CI, 1.30-3.03; P=.001) in the 1990s, and 1.81 (95%CI, 1.16-2.82; P=.01) in the 2000s. The relative risk of diabetes in the 2000s was 0.85 (95% CI, 0.61-1.20; P=.36), compared with the 1990s.

“In our community-based sample, the risk of new-onset diabetes continued to be higher in the 2000s compared with the 1970s,” the researchers wrote. “In the past decade, diabetes incidence remained steady despite the ongoing trend of rising adiposity.”

Reference

  1. Abraham TM et al. Diabetes Care. 2014;doi:10.2337/dc14-1432.