Patients with rosacea may have a higher risk for hypertension and dyslipidemia, a risk that may be partly fueled by shared inflammatory and neurovascular dysfunction mechanisms, according to findings from a meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Researchers from China systematically reviewed the literature to identify studies that reported the risk for cardiometabolic disease in patients with rosacea. In total, 13 studies with a pooled cohort of 50,442 patients with rosacea were included in the review. A meta-analysis was performed to identify the association between rosacea and the risk for various cardiovascular outcomes, including diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, ischemic heart disease (IHD), and stroke.

Patients with rosacea had a higher prevalence of dyslipidemia in 3 studies (risk ratio [RR], 1.32; 95% CI, 1.10-1.58; P =.002; I2 = 86.9%, P =.000), higher prevalence of hypertension in 5 studies (RR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.08-1.34; P =.001; I2 = 68.5%, P =.013), higher total cholesterol in 7 studies (standardized mean difference [SMD], 0.42; 95% CI, 0.17-0.68; P =.001; I2 = 73.8%, P =.001), and higher low-density lipoprotein in 7 studies (SMD, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.18-0.56; P =.000; I2 = 55.2%, P =.037).

Patients with rosacea also had a higher prevalence of higher triglycerides in 7 studies (SMD, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.08-0.49; P =.006; I2 = 60.1%, P =.020), higher systolic blood pressure (SMD, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.19-0.62; P =.000; I2 = 39.9%, P =.172) and higher diastolic blood pressure (SMD, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.19-0.81; P = .002; I2 = 69.3%, P =.021) in 4 studies, and higher fasting blood glucose in 5 studies (SMD, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.03-0.46; P =.026; I2 = 48.8%, P =.098).


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There was no association between rosacea and ischemic heart disease in 4 studies (RR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.59-1.34; P =.575; I2 = 91.1%, P =.000), stroke in 3 studies (RR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.70-1.27; P =.705; I2 = 80.7%; P =.006), diabetes in 5 studies (RR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.92-1.42; P =.216; I2 = 85.5%, P =.000), or high-density lipoprotein in 7 studies (SMD, -0.01; 95% CI, -0.14-0.11; P =.859; I2 = 5.2%; P =.387).

Limitations of this meta-analysis included the heterogeneity in the different studies, lack of clinical data available for analysis, as well as the reliance on ICD codes vs dermatologist confirmation for rosacea in some of the analyzed studies.

The investigators suggest clinicians should screen “for cardiometabolic disease indicators among rosacea patients, which may be helpful for diagnosis and appropriate treatment at an early stage of disease.”

Reference

Chen Q, Shi X, Tang Y, et al. Association between rosacea and cardiometabolic disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis [published online April 28, 2020]. J Am Acad Dermatol. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2020.04.113

This article originally appeared on Dermatology Advisor