Depressive Symptoms Tied to Diabetes Self-Management

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Researchers found that changes in depressive symptoms predicted self-efficacy and level of adherence at the 6- and 12-month follow-ups.
Researchers found that changes in depressive symptoms predicted self-efficacy and level of adherence at the 6- and 12-month follow-ups.

HealthDay News — Changes in depressive symptoms can predict improvement in self-efficacy and adherence to diabetes management, according to a study published in Diabetes Care.

Hyunsung Oh, Ph.D., from Arizona State University in Phoenix, and Kathleen Ell, D.S.W., from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, assessed follow-up data from 251 patients participating in a randomized clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of a promotora-assisted self-management intervention.

The participants included Hispanic patients with probable depression in patient-centered medical homes at safety-net clinics.

The researchers found that changes in depressive symptoms predicted self-efficacy and level of adherence at the six- and 12-month follow-ups. At six months, changes in total social support and emotional social support were correlated only with self-efficacy of diabetes management.

"Decline in depressive symptoms is a reliable predictor of improvement in self-efficacy and adherence to diabetes management," the authors write. "Further studies are recommended to study psychosocial mechanisms related to social relationships other than social support that affect diabetes management."

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