Diabetes Associated with Worse Postoperative Survival in Renal Cell Carcinoma

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Postoperative survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma may be worse for diabetes patients.
Postoperative survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma may be worse for diabetes patients.

(HealthDay News) — Diabetes is associated with worse prognosis in terms of progression-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma treated surgically, according to a study published in The Journal of Urology.

Hakmin Lee, from Seoul National University Bundang Hospital in the South Korea, and colleagues examined the correlation between diabetes and prognosis in patients with renal cell carcinoma who underwent surgical treatment. Data were reviewed for 3075 patients with nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with radical or partial nephrectomy. A total of 417 patients with diabetes were matched with 814 patients without diabetes.

The researchers found that patients with diabetes showed worse prognosis in terms of progression-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival before matching (all P<.001). In matched cohorts, patients with diabetes had inferior progression-free (P=.001), overall (P<.001), and cancer-specific survival (P<.001) compared with those without diabetes. 

Diabetes independently predicted disease progression (hazard ratio [HR]=1.766), all-cause mortality (odds ratio=1.825), and cancer-specific mortality (HR=2.266), on multivariate analyses. For patients with diabetes, high glycated hemoglobin independently predicted postoperative disease progression (HR=2.221).

"Diabetes mellitus is an independent predictor of cancer-specific and overall survival in patients who undergo surgery for renal cell carcinoma," the researchers wrote.

Reference

  1. Lee H, Kwak C, Kim HH, Byun S-S, Lee SE, Hong SK. Diabetes Mellitus as an Independent Predictor of Survival of Patients Surgically Treated for Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Propensity Score Matching Study. J Urol. 2015;194(6):1554-1560.
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