Lumbar Spine Bone Density Contributes to Fracture Risk in Some Women

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A lower T-score for lumbar spine than femoral neck increases fracture risk, particularly in older women.

Lumbar spine bone mineral density appears to up fracture risk in older women.
Lumbar spine bone mineral density appears to up fracture risk in older women.

(HealthDay News) — Lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) increases fracture risk among women with lower lumbar spine T-score than femoral neck T-score, according to a study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

Dunia Alarkawi, MBBS, MPH, from St. Vincent's Hospital in Sydney, and colleagues examined the impact of lumbar spine BMD on fracture risk in individuals with lower lumbar spine T-score than femoral neck T-score.

Participants were enrolled from the Dubbo Osteoporosis Epidemiology Study and were aged older than 60 years.

The researchers found that 573 of 2,270 women and 131 of 1,373 men had lower lumbar spine than femoral neck T-score by ≥0.6 standard deviation (SD). Each 1 SD lower lumbar spine T-score than femoral neck T-score correlated with a significantly increased fracture risk in low lumbar spine women (HR=1.30; 95% CI, 1.11-1.45).

For each 1 SD lower lumbar spine than femoral neck T-score, there was a nonsignificant increase in fracture risk for low lumbar spine men (HR=1.20; 95% CI, 0.10-1.67). 

The absolute fracture risk was greater for low lumbar spine women vs. other women, with the increased risk more pronounced for lower levels of femoral neck T-score and in older age groups.

"This study demonstrates the significant contribution of lower [lumbar spine] BMD to fracture risk over and above [femoral neck] BMD in women," the researchers wrote.

The study was partially funded by grants from the pharmaceutical industry.

Reference

  1. Alarkawi D et al. J Bone Miner Res. 2015;doi:10.1002/jbmr.2611.
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