Coffee Consumption Not Linked to Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, Diabetes

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Coffee does not appear to increase or decrease the risk for lifestyle disease like metabolic syndrome, obesity or type 2 diabetes, data published in the International Journal of Epidemiology suggest.

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Herlev and Gentofte Hospital studied the role that genes play in coffee consumption throughout the course of the day. About 93,000 Danes from the Copenhagen General Population Study were included in the analysis.

"We are the first in the world to have investigated the relationship with genes associated with a lifelong high consumption of coffee. These genes are completely independent of other lifestyle factors, and we can therefore conclude that drinking coffee in itself is not associated with lifestyle diseases," study researcher and medical student Ask Tybjaeg Nordestgaard, from the Department of Clinical Biochemistry at Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, said in a press release.

Observationally, the researchers found a link between high coffee consumption and low risk for obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. High coffee intake was associated with high BMI, waist circumference, weight, height, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides and total and LDL cholesterol, although not with glucose levels.

Nordestgaard and colleagues also evaluated genes that affect people's desire for coffee. Those with certain genes were likely to drink more coffee than people without those particular genes. 

In their analysis, they found that genetically derived high coffee intake was not associated with any of the previously mentioned metabolic factors or conditions like obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

"We can now see that the coffee genes are surprisingly not associated with a risk of developing type 2 diabetes or obesity. This suggests that drinking coffee neither causes nor protects against these lifestyle diseases," fellow researcher Boerge Nordestgaard, clinical professor at the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, and senior physician at the Department of Clinical Biochemistry at Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, said in the release.

Drinking More Coffee Linked to Less Coronary Artery Calcium
Coffee appears to have no effect on the risk for metabolic disorders.

Background: Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages. We tested the hypothesis that genetically high coffee intake is associated with low risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and with related components thereof.

Methods: We included 93 179 individuals from two large general population cohorts in a Mendelian randomization study. We tested first whether high coffee intake is associated with low risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and with related components thereof, in observational analyses; second, whether five genetic variants near theCYP1A1CYP1A2 and AHR genes are associated with coffee intake; and third, whether the genetic variants are associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and with related components thereof. Finally, we tested the genetic association with type 2 diabetes in a meta-analysis including up to 78 021 additional individuals from the DIAGRAM consortium.

READ FULL ARTICLE From International Journal of Epidemiology
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