BMI Affects Mechanisms of Diabetes Development

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The development of type 2 diabetes among Asian people is associated mainly with impaired insulin secretion (IIS) in people with normal BMI and with insulin resistance (IR) in those with high BMI, according to a study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Lead researcher Yukako Tatsumi, MS, of the Department of Mathematical Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine at Osaka University, and colleagues found that the factor that led to the development of type 2 diabetes in nonobese Asian people differed from those whose BMIs were higher than normal.

The 4-year cohort study included 3,083 participants aged 30 to 69 years who did not have diabetes at baseline. They were divided into groups based on BMI (<23.0, 23.0 to 24.9 and ≥25.0). Each participant was also classified into four categories based on insulinogenic index and homeostasis model of IR (HOMA-IR) values: normal, isolated IIS (i-IIS), isolated IR (i-IR) and IIS plus IR.

The researchers found that in participants with BMI <23.0, the risk for developing diabetes was higher in both the i-IIS and IIS plus IR groups than in the normal group. For participants with BMI ranging from 23.0 to 24.9 and BMI ≥25.0, the risk was higher in the i-IIS, i-IR, and IIS plus IR groups.

The results indicate that people with BMI <23.0 develop type 2 diabetes mainly through IIS, and those with BMI ranging from 23.0 to 24.9 and ≥25.0 develop it mainly through IR. This suggests that different measures should be undertaken to prevent diabetes based on BMI.

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BMI Affects Mechanisms of Diabetes Development

Although the association between obesity and diabetes is well known, the factors predisposing to diabetes in non-obese Asians are less clearly characterized.

To investigate the effects of impaired insulin secretion (IIS) and insulin resistance (IR) according to BMI on the incidence of diabetes in the Saku Study.

This 4-year cohort study involved 3,083 participants aged 30–69 years without diabetes at baseline (2006–2007). Participants were stratified by BMI. Based on insulinogenic index and homeostasis model of IR values, participants were classified into four categories.

Results shed some light on the relationship between BMI and development of type 2 diabetes in this patient population.

READ FULL ARTICLE From www.ajpmonline.org
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