Cannabinoids Studied as Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

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One phytocannabinoid may offer a new treatment option for type 2 diabetes.
One phytocannabinoid may offer a new treatment option for type 2 diabetes.

HealthDay News -- For patients with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) reduces fasting plasma glucose, and improves pancreatic β-cell function, adiponectin, and apolipoprotein A, according to a study published online in Diabetes Care.

Khalid A. Jadoon, from the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom, and colleagues conducted a randomized study involving 62 individuals with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes to examine the effects of cannabidiol (CBD) and THCV.

The researchers found that THCV correlated with a significant decrease in fasting plasma glucose compared with placebo, and with improved pancreatic β-cell function, adiponectin, and apolipoprotein A; plasma HDL was unaffected. CBD correlated with decreased resistin and increased glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide compared with baseline (but not placebo). No significant impact was seen on end points for the combination treatments (CBD + THCV). Both CBD and THCV were well tolerated.

"THCV could represent a new therapeutic agent in glycemic control in subjects with type 2 diabetes," the researchers wrote.

Disclosures: One author disclosed financial ties to GW Pharmaceuticals; GW Research Ltd. funded the study.

Reference

  1. Jadoon KA, Ratcliffe SH, Barrett DA, et al. Efficacy and safety of cannabidiol and tetrahydrocannabivarin on glycemic and lipid parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group pilot study. Diabetes Care. 2016. doi:10.2337/dc16-0650.
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