Does Serum Vitamin D in Pregnancy Alter T1D Development Risk in Children?

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25OHD concentration and single nucleotide polymorphisms were similar in strength between younger and older mothers.
25OHD concentration and single nucleotide polymorphisms were similar in strength between younger and older mothers.

Maternal vitamin D serum levels during pregnancy may be an early contributing factor to the genetic programing of type 1 diabetes in children, according to a study published in PLoS ONE

Researchers examined the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentration and 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 474 identified mothers of children with type 1 diabetes and compared the results with those of 348 mothers of children without diabetes. 

 

Study results showed a stronger association between serum 25OHD concentration and 2 SNPs (one in vitamin D receptor gene [rs4516035] and one in the group-specific component gene [rs12512631]) during pregnancy in mothers of children in whom type 1 diabetes ultimately developed than in mothers of children who did not have type 1 diabetes (Pinteraction = .03, .02, respectively). 

Researchers conclude “there are differences in the strength of genetic determinants of serum 25OHD concentration during pregnancy between the mothers of [children with] type 1 diabet[es] and children [without diabetes].” They suggest that maternal vitamin D metabolism in utero should be investigated in future research as a possible factor that could lead to the development of childhood type 1 diabetes. 

 

Reference

Miettinen ME, Smart MC, Kinnunen L, et al. Genetic determinants of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration during pregnancy and type 1 diabetes in the child [published online October 4, 2017]. PLoS ONE. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0184942

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