Periodontal Disease Predicts Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes

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Periodontal disease may independently predict long-term CAC progression in patients with type 1 diabetes.
Periodontal disease may independently predict long-term CAC progression in patients with type 1 diabetes.

HealthDay News — In patients with type 1 diabetes, but not those without diabetes, periodontal disease duration is an independent predictor of long-term progression of coronary artery calcium, according to a study published in The American Journal of Cardiology.

Daniel W. Groves, MD, from the University of Colorado-Denver in Aurora, and colleagues examined the interrelation between periodontal disease and coronary artery calcium (CAC) progression in individuals with and without type 1 diabetes. The prevalence and progression of CAC was assessed in relation to self-reported periodontal disease. During a mean of 6.1 years, 473 patients with type 1 diabetes and 548 without diabetes were followed.

The researchers observed no difference in the prevalence and duration of periodontal disease at baseline for subjects with vs without diabetes (14.5% vs 13.4%; P=0.60; 6 vs 9 years; P=0.18). There was no significant association observed between duration of periodontal disease and baseline CAC prevalence. However, periodontal disease duration was significantly related to CAC progression in patients with type 1 diabetes (P=0.004), but not in those without diabetes (P=0.63).

"In conclusion, this study suggests that periodontal disease is an independent predictor of long-term progression of CAC in patients with type 1 diabetes," the researchers wrote.

Reference

  1. Groves DW et al. Am J Cardiol. 2015;116(6): 833-837.
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