Daily Tea Drinking May Improve Cardiovascular Health

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Those who drank 1 cup of tea daily had a decreased risk for major cardiovascular events.
Those who drank 1 cup of tea daily had a decreased risk for major cardiovascular events.

(HealthDay News) — Drinking as little as a cup of tea daily may improve cardiovascular (CV) health, according to new research  presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2016 Scientific Sessions, held from March 1 to 4 in Phoenix.

Elliott Miller, MD, internal medicine physician and instructor of medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, and colleagues looked at data from 6212 men and women enrolled in an ongoing study that began in 2000. 

At the beginning of the study, all of the volunteers were free of cardiovascular disease (CVD), Dr Miller said. The researchers tracked the records of the men and women to see who had a heart attack, stroke, angina, or died from other types of heart disease over 11 years. The investigators also measured coronary artery calcium (CAC) progression over 5 years by comparing earlier computed tomography scans to later ones.

The researchers found that individuals who drank a cup of tea a day had about one-third less risk for a major CV event during the study period than those who did not drink tea. Tea drinkers — those who drank from 1 to 3 cups daily — also showed a decline in CAC scores. 

The researchers cannot say if drinking more than 3 cups of tea a day would lead to even better CV health. Dr Miller told HealthDay that there were very few participants who drank more than 4 cups of tea daily.

"It's too early to say drinking tea will help you have less CV events, like heart attack and stroke. But it does suggest there could be a protective nature of tea, or that tea drinkers in general are healthier individuals," Dr Miller said.

References

  1. Miller PE, Zhao D, Michos ED, et al. Abstract MP24: Association of Tea Intake with Coronary Artery Calcification and Cardiovascular Events: Results From the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Circulation. 2016;133:AMP24.
  2. American Heart Association News. Tea drinking linked to better heart health [news release]. Dallas, TX: American Heart Association Communications; March 1, 2016. http://blog.heart.org/tea-drinking-linked-to-better-heart-health. Accessed March 2, 2016.
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