Parathyroidectomy Improves Quality of Life in Primary Hyperparathyroidism

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Surgical treatment was associated with a significant increase in quality of life in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism
Surgical treatment was associated with a significant increase in quality of life in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism

(HealthDay News) – Patients undergoing parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) have lower quality-of-life (QOL) than controls undergoing thyroid surgery, but QOL improves after surgery, according to a study published in the June issue of Head & Neck.

Roderick Dulfer, MD, from the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, Netherlands, and colleagues conducted a multicenter case-control study to examine the effect of parathyroidectomy on QOL in patients with PHPT. Data were included for 52 patients with PHPT and 49 controls who underwent hemithyroidectomy; all participants completed the Short Form Health Survey-36 questionnaire.

 

The researchers found that patients with PHPT had significantly lower QOL scores before surgery. After successful surgery, QOL scores improved significantly. Postoperatively, there were no significant between-group differences in QOL.

"QOL was significantly lower in patients with untreated PHPT. Surgical treatment was associated with a significant increase in QOL," the authors write. "Decreased QOL should also be considered as an indicator for surgical treatment in patients with PHPT."

Reference

  1. Dulfer R, Geilvoet W, Morks A, et al. Impact of parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism on quality of life: A case-control study using Short Form Health Survey 36. Head & Neck. 2016; doi:10.1002/hed.24499.
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