Dietary Calcium Intake Has U-Shaped Correlation With Fracture Risk

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The pattern of dietary calcium intake and fracture risk is U-shaped for older men.
The pattern of dietary calcium intake and fracture risk is U-shaped for older men.

(HealthDay News) – Dietary calcium intake seems to have a U-shaped correlation with fracture risk in men and possibly in women, according to a study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

Aiping Fang, PhD, from Peking University in Beijing, and colleagues examined the long-term correlations between low dietary calcium intake and fracture risk in older adults with a plant-based diet. Data were included for 6210 Chinese men and women, aged 50 years or older, in a sub-cohort based on the China Health and Nutrition Survey.

 

Over a median follow-up of 7.0 years, the researchers found that 4.34% of men and 7.06% of women experienced first fracture events. For individuals in the lowest, third, and highest quintile of dietary calcium intake, the crude rates were 4.88, 2.55, and 6.83 per 1,000 person-years at risk for men and 6.72, 7.10, and 11.0 per 1,000 person-years at risk for women. For men, increased fracture risk was seen for dietary calcium intake of more than 778 mg/day (multivariate adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 2.10; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.00-4.41) or lower than 275 mg/day (HR: 1.74; 95% CI: 1.00-3.01); for women, increased fracture risk was seen for dietary calcium intake above 651 mg/day (HR: 1.54; 95% CI, 1.00-2.38), and a nonsignificant trend of increase was seen for intake below 248 mg/day (HR: 1.00; 95% CI, 0.67 to 1.50).

"The patterns of dietary calcium with fracture risk are U-shaped in men and possibly in women," the authors write.

Reference

  1. Fang A, Li K, Guo M, et al. Long-term low intake of dietary calcium and fracture risk in older adults with plant-based diet: A longitudinal study from the China health and nutrition survey. J Bone Miner Res. 2016; doi:10.1002/jbmr.2874.
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